11/12/2015

Nadura and Lindura: Three Ways to Translate Style and Resistance

Whenever a material is a means to an end and not the end itself, it's brought back to its original purpose, which is providing style and functionality, with no predetermined environments.

That's the case of these three projects carried out by our reseller Indovina by Pietro Zoratti (in Pasian di Prato, UD): a private home, a hair salon and a company's office. Three environments used in very different ways, but all sharing the need for materials expressing style and resilience.

Beyond Parquet: Lindura

When you're not willing to give up the natural look that wood gives your home's floor, but the family is also composed of two big Labradors, you need to go beyond the classic parquet in order to have a floor that keeps its integrity and brilliance over time.

That's why, for this private home in Tarcento (Udine), Lindura was the natural choice.

 

Nadura and the unexpected hardness of hairs

It's hard to imagine how something so soft and delicate like hairs can put a floor to the test.

Yet, that was hairdresser Mario Cecchini's main requirement for the floors of his salon in Udine: a material that could contrast the erosive action that hairs have on floors.

The solution in this case was Nadura's even greater hardness, along with the dark tones of the Nero Ducati version, which perfectly match the wood finishes of the walls and the overall modern style of the furniture.

Top Level's invisible technology

Resistance to foot traffic and an uncluttered surface were the qualities that company Calzavara (based in Basiliano, UD) was looking for, for their offices floors. And they found them in Nadura.

As a company operating in the telecommunications and renewable energy sectors, where state-of-the-art technology is paramount, Calzavara wanted a floor where technology would work flawlessly in the background. Hence, the choice of Top Level.

Skema's reseller Indovina creates and restores wooden, laminate and synthetic floorings. It was founded in the 1960s by Pasquale Indovina.

 

 

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